New Employee at FRS

Here at Forces Recruitment Services North we have hired a new member to help Stewart Stirling along. Chris Baker has been with us for a few weeks and below is a bit of information about who he is and what he did before he started working at Forces Recruitment Services North Birmingham.

I joined the Royal Navy when I was 16 and spent 9 years touring the world on the grey funnel lines. On leaving the Navy I spent a number of years in engineering in a variety of roles such as refrigeration service engineer, car factory worker and finally Fabricator Welder. After being made redundant twice in one year, I decided to change tack and went to Wolverhampton University and gained an Applied Science degree in Physics & Electronics with a view to becoming a Primary School Teacher. Unfortunately I couldn’t afford a further year at Uni to do my PGCE.  I literally fell into recruitment when I was up a chimney cleaning it out for a friend when someone tapped me on my foot scaring me half to death as no one else was supposed to be there. It was my friends brother in law, “ I believe you are looking for work at the moment” he said, “ Ever thought about recruitment”. That was almost 15 years ago and I have been in Technical recruitment for the past fourteen and a half years. I had a short break from recruitment working at Maier UK Ltd and Argos (Barton), before joining Forces Recruitment in early March.

Chris Baker

We want to say a warm welcome to Chris; he’s a great asset to the team.

Engineering Industry

Engineers determine the most effective ways to use the basic factors of production –people, machines, materials, information, and energy — to make a product or to provide a service. They are the bridge between management goals and operational performance. They are more concerned with increasing productivity through the management of people, methods of business organization, and technology than people in other specialties, who generally work more with products or processes. Although most engineers work in manufacturing industries, they may also work in consulting services, healthcare, and communications. To solve organizational, production, and related problems most efficiently, engineers carefully study the product and its requirements, use mathematical methods such as operations research to meet those requirements, and design manufacturing and information systems. They develop management control systems to aid in financial planning and cost analysis and design production planning and control systems to coordinate activities and ensure product quality. They also design or improve systems for the physical distribution of goods and services. Engineers determine which plant location has the best combination of raw materials availability, transportation facilities, and costs. Engineers use computers for simulations and to control various activities and devices, such as assembly lines and robots. They also develop wage and salary administration systems and job evaluation programs. Many engineers move into management positions because the work is closely related.

The work of health and safety engineers is similar to that of industrial engineers in that it deals with the entire production process. Health and safety engineers promote worksite or product safety and health by applying knowledge of industrial processes, as well as mechanical, chemical, and psychological principles. They must be able to anticipate, recognize, and evaluate hazardous conditions as well as develop hazard control methods. They also must be familiar with the application of health and safety regulations.

The engineering-related industries all experienced substantial growth in turnover between 1999 and 2007.

Production industries reported turnover of £632.5m in 2007, a 19% rise since 1999. Manufacturing accounted for £505m of this. Construction enterprises saw turnover increase a huge 76% over the eight year period; the housing boom fuelling it to a massive £196m in 2007. The turnover from technical testing and analysis and R&D on natural science and engineering companies more than doubled to £3.5m and £12.5m respectively, and ‘architectural and engineering activities and related consultancy’ businesses reported £42m turnover in 2007, also having risen by a huge 78% in this period of rapid economic growth.

Engineering Statistics:

ELC Funding

The MOD’s Enhanced Learning Credits Scheme (ELC) is an initiative to promote lifelong learning amongst members of the Armed Forces. The ELC scheme provides financial support in the form of a single up-front payment in each of a maximum of three separate financial years. You are reminded that ELC funding is only available for pursuit of higher level learning i.e. for courses that result in a nationally recognised qualification at Level three or above on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) (England and Wales), a Level six or above on the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF) or, if pursued overseas, an approved international equivalent qualification.

As such you must ensure that you are able to demonstrate the level of the course to your Education Staff / Single Service Representative when asking them to authorise your claim.

There are several stages to the ELC process. Full information is set out in Joint Service Publications (JSP) 898 Part 4, Chapter 3 – The Enhanced Learning Credit Scheme: The Sponsorship of Service Personnel for Personal Development. Have a look at the claim procedure flow chart Annex A to the JSP.

  • First you must register to become a Scheme Member and accrue a sufficient amount of service before you can submit a claim
  • Then you must select a relevant course ensuring that it meets the higher level learning criteria (level three or above) and an Approved ELC Provider
  • Thirdly, you must complete and submit an ELC claim, approved by an authorised Education Staff if you are in service or your Single Service Representative if you are out of service.
  • Finally you must complete your Course Evaluation Form via the website. Further claims cannot be processed until evaluation forms are received for all previous courses (even those still underway).

The Enhanced Learning Credits Administration Service (ELCAS) provide the administrative support for the ELC Scheme. Education Staff and Single Service Representative are responsible for approval of both ELC Application and Claims.

We’re Expanding!!!

We are expanding to a bigger office in the middle of April. Forces Recruitment Service North and East Birmingham are moving to Falcon Point were we will inhabit a much larger working space.

We are hoping that this will open up new experiences for us and help the company in the long run. It also opens up new revenues for FRS North and East Birmingham to explore and adapt to.

Moving into a new home, Wish us luck!!!

New Employee at FRS

Here at Forces Recruitment Services North we have hired a new member to help Stewart Stirling along. Lisa Harris has been with us for a few weeks and below is a bit of information about who she is and what she did before she started working at Forces Recruitment Services North Birmingham.

Husband was in the RAF for 22 years. Whilst living the military lifestyle, we were posted to a number of UK camps and one NATO posting in Italy. June Recruitment career. First with Randstad in-house as a temporary Recruitment Administrator, later was a permanent fixture in branch, working on the commercial desk.  In Jan 2006, started working as a Resourcer at Teleresources (later know as Vedior1 and Randstad Managed Services). For key accounts and placing temporary commercial staff for Atos Origin, CSC, AMS and Rolls Royce. Currently, working as a Senior Account Manager for Forces Recruitment Services, North Birmingham office.

Lisa Harris

We want to say a warm welcome to Lisa; she’s a great asset to the team.